(RE)SEARCH

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Round Edge investigates how urban memory and visual culture intersect. Urban environments have been

re-presented by many different images and visual forms - paintings, drawings, photographs, films, plans, maps, digital visualisations and videos of imagined and real cities. Representing the urban, influences our engagement with built spaces; and how we live together. 

 

How are our collective memory and our visual culture influenced and shaped by the built environment around us?  Moving from a modern city to a contemporary city with rapid changes in politics, economics, society, and this built environment - are we building participatory,

 representative, approachable/open and safe spaces with round edges, and leaving the sharp edges of modernity behind? - or are we de-humanizing the built and planned. Exploring our urban realities and re-articulating the spaces around us, we aim at understanding our human collective. 

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TEXT & TEXTURES OF URBAN MEMORY

"Aaron Betsky moderates a discussion about the connection between text, textural aspects of urban life, and memory within an urban context."

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URBAN MEMORY AND VISUAL CULTURE
IN BERLIN

"What does it mean to remember place in the city, which is a site of the rapid turnover of buildings and (infra)structures?

Berlin is, of course, a unique city, but the ways in which post-war urban planning imposed itself on both halves of the divided city actually speaks to a generic condition in which place memory emerges in response to radical transformation of the built environment.

What is place memory? Frequently it is described as an authentic relationship to the environment that has been lost in the abstract frameworks and infrastructures of modernity."

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BINDING SPACE 

"Explores the role of the book form within the realm of architectural representation. It proposes the book itself as another three-dimensional, complementary architectural representation with a generational and propositional role within the design process."

BRINGING BACK EMOTION AND INTIMACY IN ARCHITECTURE / ADRIAN BICA

"In his talk, Adrian argues that the world we are designing lacks meaning and as a result, we’re unable to connect with the world around us. The buildings we enter every day are unable to evoke the emotions they once did. Adrian aims to shed light on this issue, so that once acknowledged, we can together rebuild the lost relationship between humans and architecture."

"EVERY KIND OF ARCHITECTURAL DEFINITION HAS AN IN-BETWEEN SPACE" / SOU FUJIMOTO 

"In this movie Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto discusses his philosophy of designing structures that are "in between" opposing concepts such as nature and architecture, and says the approach could work just as well on a skyscraper as a small private house. "Nature and architecture are fundamental themes [of my work]," says Fujimoto, speaking to Dezeen after giving his keynote speech at this year's World Architecture Festival. "I like to find something in between. Not only nature and architecture but also inside and outside. Every kind of definition has an in-between space. Especially if the definitions are two opposites, then the in-between space is more rich."

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WHAT DO IMAGES IN THE PUBLIC
SPACE DO?

"The performativity of images is to be considered in relation to their spatiality that gives them a public status, through which images are made into pictures to be shared and looked at by many people. We can therefore think about the effects produced by the pictures once exhibited in a public space. Can the exhibition in a place everyone can access be sufficient to make these images public? How do images materialize themselves in space and through which media and locations?"

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ART IN CITIES / CITIES IN ARTS

"Exploring simultaneously “cities in arts” and “arts in the cities” involves analyzing the plurality and complexity of the links between cities, societies and arts. Thus, this issue combines an internal analysis of the artworks (to highlight the question of urban representation in arts) and an external analysis of artworks (to question the co-production of arts and cities and the reception of art works in an urban context). Comparative reading within and

in-between the papers in this issue will outline common concerns related to the capacity of arts to participate, to transform, to contest or to reveal the way cities are produced, as well as the capacities of cities and urban places to participate in art making."

MONTAGE AND THE METROPOLIS: ARCHITECTURE, MODERNITY, AND THE REPRESENTATION OF SPACE